Tribute to author, Anton Mazzanovich and his involvement in “Trailing GERONIMO”

Anton Mazzanovich-Anton Mazzanovich was born in Lesina, then part of Austria-Hungary now Hvar, Croatia[5]. The population of his homeland was steadily declining as the youth was forced into the military to fight in foreign wars and the young Mazzanovich family decided to emigrate from Habsburg Austria to the United States in 1868[6]. After running away from home, he enlisted in the U.S. Army without his parents’ knowledge when he was not yet in his teens but his father was able to return him home once he found where Anton was stationed. Anton eventually got his way and joined the famed U.S. 6th Cavalry and was posted at Fort Lowell in Tucson in 1881. He was a participant in the Apache Wars. He died on 31 July 1934 and was buried in Arizona.[14]

And I offer you just a glimpse into the Author’s writing the very informative Book-Trailing Geronimo. Without his Service in the US Calvary in the Apache Wars, we might never have been reading glimpses into that Past. The Collection of photos in this Book are fascinating. Many I had never seen before. I’ve shared a few straight from the Book. This Book was Copyrighted in 1926 and I used the Revised Version of 1931. By Copy Right Laws for pre-1974 Work, the author has to have been passed away by 70 years. I do not take Copy Right infringement lightly and share only a little only so that you might want to become interested enough in the amazing History of the Great Apache American Indian Tribes. And to know their History as well as American History of the US Calvary. These Brave men and women who were engaged in the Apache Wars were some of the toughest men alive during that period and the Apache was maybe the fiercest of all American Native Indian Tribes. They did not want to be corralled up like Cattle and given Rations to live.

Their Freedom was Stolen from them. Today, we can only argue about the past and it’s tribulations. But we did not live them. No, we did not.

Probably the most popular and still timely Today is

And Who was GERONIMO?

Geronimo was born in what is today Arizona in the upper Gila River country on June 16, 1829. His birth name was Goyahkla, or “one who yawns.” He was part of the Bedonkohe subsection of the Chiricahua tribe of Apaches, a small but mighty group of around 8,000 people. By the time he came of age, the Apaches were at war with Mexicans to the South, the U.S. government to the North and neighboring Comanche and Navajo tribes. He showed early promise as a hunter and led four successful raids on nearby tribes by age 17.

Personal tragedy shaped his lifelong hatred for anyone who attempted to subject him or his people. While he was away on a trading trip in 1851, Mexican soldiers led by Colonel Jose Maria Carrasco attacked his family’s camp. Geronimo’s wife, Alope, their three children and his mother were all murdered. On March 6, 1858, a company of 400 Mexican soldiers from Sonora led by Colonel José María Carrasco attacked Goyahkla’s camp, including his family, outside Janos while the men were in town trading.     Among those killed were Goyahkla’s wife, his children, and his mother.    His chief, Mangas Coloradas, sent him to Cochise’s band for help in revenge against the Mexicans.     Allegedly it was during this incident that the name Geronimo came about.      This appellation stemmed from a battle in which, ignoring a deadly hail of bullets, he repeatedly attacked Mexican soldiers with a knife, causing them to utter appeals to Saint Jerome (“Jeronimo!”).  Americans heard this and thought his name was Geronimo, and the name stuck.

Wild with grief, Geronimo burned his family’s belonging according to Apache tradition before heading into the forest, where he claimed he heard a voice that told him: “No gun will ever kill you. I will take the bullets from the guns … and I will guide your arrows.” He soon hunted down his family’s killers and devoted his life to avenging them.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.history.com/.amp/topics/native-american-history/geronimo

And the lands where the Apache Indian Lived was extremely tough. Hard to live there but they did. Yes, they did.

And the White Man is determined to Lockup all things misunderstood. And after Gernoimo’s people got their Rations at the Reservation, they went to WAR! Went on the Warpath!

Apache Indians drawing their Rations at the San Carlos Reservation in 1881.

In 1871, I found this interesting and then the Medal they got in a picture.

The 1871 Medal taken from the Dead Medicine man.

?

Which Medicine Man had the US Government labeled a Trouble Maker?

Apache Before the Storm, Edwards S. Curtis, 1906

The last band of Apache raiders, active in ensuing years under the Chiricahua Warrior Geronimo, was hunted down in 1886 and sent first to Florida, then to Alabama, and finally to the Oklahoma Territory, where they settled among the Kiowa-Apache.

The major Apache groups, each speaking a different dialect, include the Jicarilla and Mescalero of New Mexico, the Chiricahua of the Arizona-New Mexico border area, and the Western Apache of Arizona. The Yavapai-Apache Nation Reservation is southwest of Flagstaff, Arizona. Other groups were the Lipan Apache of south-western Texas and the Plains Apache of Oklahoma.

The White Mountain Apache Tribe is located in the east-central region of Arizona, 194 miles northeast of Phoenix. This group manages the popular Sunrise Park Ski Resort and Fort Apache Timber Company. The Tonto Apache Reservation was created in 1972 near Payson in eastern Arizona. Within the Tonto National Forest, northeast of Phoenix, the reservation consists of 85 acres, serves about 100 tribal members, and operates a casino.

Noted leaders have included CochiseMangas ColoradasChief Victorio, and Geronimo, who the U.S. Army found to be fierce warriors and skillful strategists.

So, even Today, all Americans can take time to pay Tribute to the Brave Apache and to the US Calvary who engaged in Wars in the 1800s. One fighting to keep their way of life and the other trying to subdue their way of life away from the Apache. And their Lands were Stolen.

Yes, American Settlers from all over the World made up of Immigrants from all over the World did take the Lands away from the American Indian and no one can deny that. But please, do Enjoy reading and knowing that others were here long before any of us and one day, we will be replaced by others as well. And maybe they will or won’t want to know our History. Here are some pics-