In 1863, The North’s Appetite for War was so Poor, that the Union almost Sued for Peace foregoing Unbinding The Shackles of Slavery.

April 12, 1861 – April 9, 1865

After a Successful Year in 1862 for the Confederacy, apparently the Majority of People in the North wanted PEACE and weren’t Onboard to FREE THE SLAVES in all Northern States! War And it’s Violent Hands was a bitter Pill to swallow and Freeing the Slaves had apparently lost its Luster if there ever was…

But seldom do we get a chance to see Views from that Time Period giving all of us Insight that we need to see. We must see.

And President Lincoln called the Shots right because a Vote by the People would have gone otherwise.

Only 30 years after the Great War ends, here above are Words to see…from then

Joseph T. Derry? Author of Civil War History

Civil War Veteran, Professor at Wesleyan College. Teacher, historian and poet. Member of Mulberry Street United Methodist Church.
He taught Woodrow Wilson at one time.
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He was born in Milledgeville, to William Cowan Derry, and Mary Bunell Derry. Derry served with Stonewall Jackson in Virginia and with Beauregard in Tennessee. Captured in Huntsville in 1862, he was exchanged for a Union prisoner, but was recaptured at Kennesaw Mountain two years later and held prisoner until the war’s end. After the war he became a distinguished professor of language at Wesleyan College and taught Woodrow Wilson as a student in Augusta. He was the author of at least three books: Perry’s History of the United States, the Story of the Confederate States, and The Industrial Strife of Brothers.
He lived in Augusta, Georgia, as well as Charleston , South Carolina and Macon.

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