The Most Honorable Question of Confederate Statues…answered in 1893

Don’t Guess the Past. Don’t rewrite the many truths that are still sitting around ready for your eyes to see and written by those who fought. By those who lost family and friends on both Sides. To stoically Say the South were your Enemies is like saying-All People Today from the South are my Enemies. Like you fought in the Civil War yourself. Do not make less of the Deaths of all the Brave Men who fought on both sides of the Civil War. Know Your Past and the Past of Others by Studying and reading it. And with millions of Deaths, aren’t their sacrifices still worth honoring. Anyone can make Slavery your only focal point. But this one point makes all of us so nearsighted and lacks true understanding of the what had transpired and what great Harm the South suffered at the End of the War and when Cruel men came to the Southern States with nothing but Crimes and Rapes in their Hearts against all living in the South. One easily forgets that the North was every bit involved in Slavery and had Slaves too. To ignore this point is ridiculous.

But Slavery, no matter in what form, is wholly wrong. But it still exists Today here in America where men, women, and children are FORCED TO WORK where they were KIDNAPPED. What do you think Human Trafficking is? It’s Human Bondage. These are the Battles people need to be fighting to Stop instead if crying over a Statute. One day, your Statutes you cried to have put up may be ripped down too if another Civil War takes place and it could Happen. I pray not. But there are stupid people just like the ones telling false self-amusing Truths about the CIVIL War. By doing so,you Open the Door for more Civil War. Yes, you do.

The Regular Soldiers

Average Soldiers.jpg

Originally aired on November 11, 1994 – In part 11 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson provides proof that Johnny Rebs and Billy Yanks came in every size and shape and every background.

#11 – Common Soldiers: Ages and Sizes

Johnny Rebs and Billy Yanks who fought in the great Civil War came in every shape and size, and from every background.

While some regiments were composed predominantly of farmers, or clerks, or students, other units gained attention because of the different occupations of their members. For example, the 19th Virginia came from the central part of Virginia. Of its 749 original members, 302 were farmers, 80 were laborers, and 56 were machinists. Among the remainder were ten lawyers, fourteen teachers, twenty-four students, three blacksmiths, two artists, a well-digger, a dentist, a bootlegger, and four men who classified themselves as “Gentlemen”.

The typical Civil War soldier was five feet, seven inches tall. He was a white, native-born farmer, Protestant, single, and in the 18 to 29 age bracket. Yet the ages of the men of blue and gray covered a broad spectrum. Boys often marched alongside men old enough to be their fathers. Much has been written of youngsters serving as drummer boys, but older soldiers performed the same duty. David Scanlon of Pulaski County, Virginia, was a drummer boy at the age of fifty-two.

Because eighteen was the minimum age for enlistment, many underage boys were known to write the figure “18” on a slip of paper and insert it into a shoe. When asked by a recruiting officer how old they were, the lads would respond truthfully: “I’m over eighteen.”

Originally aired on November 11, 1994 – In part 11 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson provides proof that Johnny Rebs and Billy Yanks came in every size and shape and every background.

#11 – Common Soldiers: Ages and Sizes

Johnny Rebs and Billy Yanks who fought in the great Civil War came in every shape and size, and from every background.

The typical Civil War soldier was five feet, seven inches tall. He was a white, native-born farmer, Protestant, single, and in the 18 to 29 age bracket. Yet the ages of the men of blue and gray covered a broad spectrum. Boys often marched alongside men old enough to be their fathers. Much has been written of youngsters serving as drummer boys, but older soldiers performed the same duty. David Scanlon of Pulaski County, Virginia, was a drummer boy at the age of fifty-two.

Because eighteen was the minimum age for enlistment, many underage boys were known to write the figure “18” on a slip of paper and insert it into a shoe. When asked by a recruiting officer how old they were, the lads would respond truthfully: “I’m over eighteen.”

Charles C. Hay was probably the youngest Confederate. He joined an Alabama regiment at the age of eleven. The champion “blue baby” (as such Northern youngsters were called) was Edward Black of Indianapolis. He joined an Indiana unit with his father. Edward Black was nine years old. These youngsters held their own in combat. At the battle of Shiloh, fifteen year old John Roberts of Tennessee went down twice after being hit by spent balls; he had his musket blown to pieces in his hands, but Roberts continued throughout the fighting to display what his commander called “the coolness and courage of a veteran”.

It was somewhat crowded at the other end of the age chart. Many men served in the armies while in their sixties. The oldest Confederate soldier was E. Pollard. He listed his age as sixty-two when he joined a North Carolina regiment, yet indications are strong that Pollard was over seventy. The oldest Federal – the oldest Civil War soldier – was Curtis King, a transplanted Virginian who enlisted in an Iowa home guard unity at the age of eighty. King served a few months before being discharged for general disability.

Above exert was from-

https://www.wvtf.org/civil-war-series/2020-01-26/the-regular-soldiers?_amp=true

Read the last sentence in the Confederate Article

In the Confederate Veteran Magazine of 1893, there is this Poem by a Poet Priest. It’s on page 29.

A Confederate and a US Senator. But because he was once a Confederate, many Say Tear IT DOWN! Tear that Stator down. Mention a person was a Slave Owner and they come out Screaming TEAT IT DOWN! And I must admit, I wonder if it really is Slavery that they are honestly Upset about or their own miserable existence for their own failures in their own Lives. Misery loves Company. I just don’t know. But it is sad that a middle road cannot be found.

Dedicated to 12,000 Dead Soldiers

These magazines are comprised of exceptional writing and offers insights to many things we ask today about the CIVIL War. Below is your Link to an amazing View of a historical Event-The Civil War

https://scv.org/confederate-veteran-magazine/

Sure, some things will be very biased towards a Proud and Hurt And Suffering South. A South Bitter about its Loss and the treacherous betrayals afterwards that followed. But it’s very readable and Views of those Times.