2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPICS

 

 

2020TOKYOSUMMEROLYMPICSGOLDMEDAL

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPICS GOLD MEDAL

2020TOKYOSUMMEROLYMPICSSILVERMEDAL

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPICS SILVER MEDAL

2020TOKYOSUMMEROLYMPICSBRONZEMEDAL

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPICS BRONZE MEDAL

Well, it’s almost here.  The Greatest of all the World Olympians will gather in Tokyo, Japan and only one will be Crowned for their dedication and display of his or her wonderful athleticism as the best of the best.  The best in your Sporting Event?  Who will it be?

And in AMAZING JAPAN!

AND IN TOKYO!

One of the best Venues in the World for the 2020 Olympic Games!

Folks, it’s time to get excited.  These action packed events are almost upon us.  A year will vanish like water poured into a glass.  A year is nothing.  A year is no time at all.  Yes, in less than a year, the Real Excitement will begin and it will be upon all of us.  And I hope you get a chance to watch all the Athletes, the beginning entrance and ending ceremonies.  And to be able to watch all these wonderful men and women who will be performing and coming to Tokyo from all over the World in hopes by first making an Olympic Team and then claiming one of those absolutely beautiful Olympic Medals.  And in some cases, there is so very little difference from the Winner and the person that comes in last.  I mean in some cases, it is only hundreds of a second.  And maybe just half a second or maybe one single full second.  But that time is like an eternity from what happens to the Winner.  He or She will be Pulled Up on High and be anointed the best of the best.  A grand thing indeed.

THE BEST OF THE VERY BEST!

No other words can be said.  The best of the BEST!  In all the World.  And who will come away from Japan with a Medal around his or her neck?

This is not a Political Stage.

It is an Athlete Stage.  And all the trials and tribulations and preparations that have taken place for years and now, the last days leading up to 2020.  Less than a year now.

And if that doesn’t get your athlete in your wake-up, then it just might not ever get woke up.

But will the Lightning Boy’s Record in the Men’s 100 Meter and 200 Meter fall?  And which other Records will fall?

Osain Bolt!  And will his amazing Olympic Records fall?  Well, here’s some hands that will compete to see if they can get to the Top of Mt. Olympus.  Right?  lol

 

100 Meters Current Rankings and speeds!  The Sub 10 Second Crowd!

RANK MARK WIND COMPETITOR DOB NAT
1 9.81 -0.1 Christian COLEMAN 06 MAR 1996 USA
2 9.86 +0.9 Noah LYLES 18 JUL 1997 USA
2 9.86 +0.8 Divine ODUDURU 07 OCT 1996 NGR
4 9.87 -0.1 Justin GATLIN 10 FEB 1982 USA
5 9.93 +0.8 Cravon GILLESPIE 31 JUL 1996 USA
5 9.93 +0.5 Akani SIMBINE 21 SEP 1993 RSA
5 9.93 +1.9 Arthur CISSÉ 29 DEC 1996 CIV
8 9.95 +0.5 Zharnel HUGHES 13 JUL 1995 GBR
9 9.96 +0.4 Yohan BLAKE 26 DEC 1989 JAM
9 9.96 +1.7 Aaron BROWN 27 MAY 1992 CAN
11 9.97 +0.9 Reece PRESCOD 29 FEB 1996 GBR
11 9.97 +0.8 Abdul Hakim SANI BROWN 06 MAR 1999 JPN
13 9.98 +1.0 Roberto SKYERS 12 NOV 1991 CUB
13 9.98 +1.3 Mario BURKE 18 MAR 1997 BAR
13 9.98 +0.5 Yuki KOIKE 13 MAY 1995 JPN
13 9.98 +1.1 Andre DE GRASSE 10 NOV 1994 CAN
17 9.99 +1.8 Isiah YOUNG 05 JAN 1990 USA

OsanBolt

And who’s gonna take down this amazing record?  You?  Yes, who?  Well, here’s some some that will be trying-

200 Meters Current Rankings and Speeds!  The Sub 20 Second Crowd!

RANK MARK WIND COMPETITOR DOB NAT
1 19.50 -0.1 Noah LYLES 18 JUL 1997 USA
2 19.70 +0.7 Michael NORMAN 03 DEC 1997 USA
3 19.73 +0.8 Divine ODUDURU 07 OCT 1996 NGR
4 19.82 -0.8 Kenneth BEDNAREK 14 OCT 1998 USA
5 19.87 -0.1 Alex QUIÑÓNEZ 11 AUG 1989 ECU
6 19.88 +0.9 Zhenye XIE 17 AUG 1993 CHN
7 19.91 -0.6 Andre DE GRASSE 10 NOV 1994 CAN
7 19.91 +0.6 Christian COLEMAN 06 MAR 1996 USA
9 19.93 +0.8 Cravon GILLESPIE 31 JUL 1996 USA
10 19.95 -0.1 Aaron BROWN 27 MAY 1992 CAN
11 19.97 +0.9 Miguel FRANCIS 28 MAR 1995 GBR
12 19.98 +1.5 Alex WILSON 19 SEP 1990 SUI
13 19.99 +1.3 Ramil GULIYEV 29 MAY 1990 TUR

And who will it be?  Yes, who will walk away with which Olympic Medal?

Will World Records Fall?

Will Olympic Records Fall?

The game is almost upon us all.

And right now is the time to get focused.  Very, very focused if you are one of the ones that must push his or her body to its maximum performance.  And the World will bow down to your name if you are that individual.

If you walk away with a Medal in Tokyo in 2020, then YOU THE MAN!  then YOU THE WOMAN!

OLYMPICS 2020!  AND IN TOKYO, JAPAN.  Will you be there?  Or like millions all over the World, will you be watching a special Athlete?  Who?  Whom will you be watching?

Will you have a favorite?

Will you follow the best of the best or will you be following your Nation’s Total Olympic Medal Count?

Have you been following the World Championships?

Yes, oh my, I have. And they have been great.

All of the Athletes are now tuning their bodies and minds into that Super Special Place where only the true Olympians will come, show, and then walk away Victorious.

Yes, who is going to be the one that makes folks smile and others just shake their heads in amazement?  And I predict that there will be Olympic Records that will fall.

In SWIMMING?

In DIVING?

In RUNNING?

Which Sports will you be following?

Will one of these absolutely beautiful Medals be proudly displayed from around your neck?  Will one?  Hmm…and the World is already speculating on Who’s the Best of the Best?  Who will be declared

OLYMPIC CHAMPION

And the events?  Location and venue capacity.  Below is an exert from the following link-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_Summer_Olympics

Venue Events Capacity Status
New National Stadium Opening and closing ceremonies 60,102 Under construction
Athletics
Football (finals)
Yoyogi National Gymnasium Handball 13,291 Existing
Ryōgoku Kokugikan Boxing 11,098 Existing
Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium Table tennis 10,000 Existing
Nippon Budokan Judo 14,471 Existing
Karate
Tokyo International Forum Weightlifting 5,012 Existing
Imperial Palace Gardens Athletics (marathon, race walk) 5,000 seated, unlimited standing room along route Temporary
Musashinomori Park[15] Road cycling (start road races) Temporary

Tokyo Bay Zone[edit]

There will be 13 venues for 15 sports located in the vicinity of Tokyo Bay, southeast of the Olympic Village, predominantly on AriakeOdaiba and the surrounding artificial islands.

Venue Events Capacity Status
Kasai Rinkai Park Canoeing (slalom) 8,000 Ready, built for the games
Oi Hockey Stadium Field hockey 15,000 Under construction[16]
Olympic Aquatics Centre Aquatics (swimming, diving, synchronized swimming) 15,000 Under construction
Tokyo Tatsumi International Swimming Center Water polo[17] 3,635 Existing
Yumenoshima Park Archery 7,000 Under construction[18]
Ariake Arena Volleyball 15,000 Under construction
Olympic BMX Course BMX cycling 6,000 Under construction
Skateboarding
Olympic Gymnastic Centre Gymnastics (artistic, rhythmic, trampoline) 10,000 Temporary
Ariake Coliseum Tennis 20,000 = 10,000 centre court; 5,000 court 1; 3,000 court 2; 2,000 match courts (8×250) Existing, renovated
Odaiba Marine Park Triathlon 5,000 seated, unlimited standing room along route Existing with temporary stands
Aquatics (marathon swimming)
Shiokaze Park Beach volleyball 12,000 Temporary
Central Breakwater Equestrian (eventing) 20,000 Existing with temporary infrastructure
Rowing
Canoeing (sprint)
Aomi Urban Sports Venue 3×3 basketball 5,000 Temporary
Sport climbing

Outlying venues[edit]

Twelve venues for 16 sports will be situated farther than 8 kilometres (5 miles) from the Olympic Village.

Venue Events Capacity Status
Camp Asaka Shooting Existing, renovated
Musashino Forest Sports Plaza Modern pentathlon (fencing) 10,000 Ready, built for the games
Badminton[19]
Ajinomoto Stadium Football 49,970[20] Existing
Modern pentathlon (excluding fencing)
Rugby sevens
Saitama Super Arena Basketball 22,000[21] Existing
Enoshima Sailing 10,000[22] Existing with temporary stands
Makuhari Messe Fencing 6,000 Existing with temporary stands
Taekwondo
Wrestling 8,000[23]
Baji Koen Equestrian (dressage, jumping)[24] Existing with temporary stands
Kasumigaseki Country Club Golf 30,000[25][26] Existing with temporary stands
Izu Velodrome Track cycling 5,000[27] Existing, expanded
Izu Mountain Bike Course Mountain biking[28]
Yokohama Stadium Baseball 30,000[29] Existing
Softball
Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium Baseball (opening match) 30,000 Existing, renovated
Softball (opening match) [30]
Fuji International Speedway Road cycling
(finish road races, time trial)
Existing

Football venues[edit]

Venue Location Events Matches Capacity Status
International Stadium Yokohama[31] Yokohama Men’s and Women’s preliminaries and quarter-final, Women’s semi-final, Men’s final 10 70,000 Existing
Tokyo Stadium Tokyo Men’s and Women’s opening round of preliminaries only 4 49,000 Existing
Saitama Stadium Saitama Men’s and Women’s preliminaries and quarter-final, Men’s semi-final and 3rd place play-off 11 62,000 Existing
Miyagi Stadium Sendai Men’s and Women’s preliminaries and quarter-final 10 49,000 Existing
Kashima Soccer Stadium Kashima Men’s and Women’s preliminaries, quarter-final and semi-final, Women’s 3rd place play-off 10 40,728 Existing
Sapporo Dome Sapporo Men’s and Women’s preliminaries 10 42,000 Existing
New National Stadium Tokyo Women’s final 2 60,012 Under construction

AND WHICH EVENTS, AT WHAT TIME?  For some good News on this, just try the following link-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_Summer_Olympics

And will it be a wonderful time for Nations from all over the World to bring Open Arms of Love and Trust?  Will New Bonds amongst Nations take place?

Although the ancient Games were staged in Olympia, Greece, from 776 BC through 393 AD, it took 1503 years for the Olympics to return. The first modern Olympics were held in Athens, Greece, in 1896. The man responsible for its rebirth was a Frenchman named Baron Pierre de Coubertin, who presented the idea in 1894.

Will there be no eventful events that might maul these amazing Games?  I pray nothing will take place to distract from these wonderful games and their true meanings.

And to Japan, I just want to say this-

CONGRATULATIONS AND TAKE HEART IN THIS MOMENT IN TIME WHEN ALL THE WORLD WILL SEE JAPAN AS A GREAT NATION.  A GREAT NATION THAT HOSTED THE 2020 OLYMPIC GAMES. WAY TO GO!

And to all the Athletes participating-

CONGRATULATIONS AND TAKE HEART IN THIS MOMENT IN TIME WHEN ALL THE WORLD WILL SEE YOU AND THE WONDERFUL GIFT OR ABILITY THAT YOU POSSESS.  GOOD LUCK!

And who are some of the ones that everyone will be keeping their eyes on?

Well, I have been watching a lot of them and here’s a great link to see if your favorite Athlete is in the News for this Amazing Trip to Japan-

https://www.si.com/olympics/2019/07/24/2020-tokyo-olympics-one-year-out-preview

And here’s a wonderful glimpse of the Olympics History from-

https://www.olympic.org/ancient-olympic-games/history

OLYMPIC HISTORY – FROM THE HOME OF ZEUS IN OLYMPIA TO THE MODERN GAMES

AS A SACRED PLACE USED REGULARLY IN RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES, AS WELL AS PLAYING HOST TO THE ANCIENT GAMES, OLYMPIA WAS AT THE CENTRE OF GREEK CIVILISATION. RENOWNED EXPERT PAUL CHRISTESEN GIVES OLYMPIC.ORG A UNIQUE INSIGHT INTO OLYMPIA AND HOW THE SITE CHANGED AS THE GAMES GREW.

“At its heart the Ancient Olympic Games was a religious festival held in a religious sanctuary,” Paul Christesen, professor of Ancient Greek History at Dartmouth College, USA, explained.

As Christesen went on to say, “it was not just a matter of playing sports”. And central to this concept was the site itself. Olympia lay on the north-western corner of the Peloponnese.

Zeus, King of the Greek Gods, was said to have taken up residence in Olympia around 1200BC when the Eleans conquered the surrounding area. The fearsome deity marked his ascension by hurling a thunderbolt into the sacred grove from his home atop Mount Olympus.

The city state of Elis, the administrative centre of which was about a day’s walk north from Olympia, ran the Games throughout the vast majority of its life cycle, with the Eleans seizing full control from their local rivals the Pisatans in 572BC. Despite the stadium accommodating more than 40,000 people during the height of the Games’ popularity in the second century AD, it always remained a deeply rural setting.

“We know that they actually planted the stadium with wheat,” Christesen said. “It was a big empty space that wasn’t being used most of the time, so except in the run-up to the Games, when they got it all cleaned up, it was just a wheat field.”

From the first edition in 776BC until 550BC, the Games took place among the sanctuary itself. The sacred olive tree of Zeus, from which the victory wreaths were cut, marked the finishing line for all races. The first stadium, a simple affair using the natural embankments of the surrounding hills, remained within the deified area too. The discovery of more than 150 wells dating to this time indicates that even this early in the life of the Olympic Games, they attracted considerable attention.

By the mid fourth century BC the third incarnation of the stadium was built. Spacious and with the look and feel of a more modern venue, spectator attendance grew by around 50%. The position of the stadium had been shifted, with events no longer finishing at the altar of Zeus.

However, the site lost none of its religious potency during the vast majority of the 1000-plus years of the Ancient Games, its diversity being key to its survival.

“The Greeks were aggressively polytheistic,” said Christesen. “So while Olympia is a sanctuary to Zeus we know that he wasn’t the only deity worshipped at the site. There were over 70 different altars, you could sacrifice to pretty much anyone you wanted to.”

While the Eleans maintained a permanent presence at Olympia, conducting monthly sacrifices, the site turned, for one week per year, from an essentially peaceful idyll into the mad, riotous centre of Greece.

“Anyone who wanted to get a big audience from all over the Greek world showed up in Olympia. Painters, artists, orators all went there to put their wares on display,” Christesen said.

“We know there was total chaos for a week because anyone who wanted to raise their profile, this was the place and time to do it.”

The fourth incarnation of the stadium came in the first century as, fuelled by the return of chariot racing to the programme in AD17, the popularity of the Games soared. Interest reached a pinnacle in the following century and the fifth and final renovation took place.

Throughout these reincarnations the length of the track in the stadium remained constant. Stories abound as to why it always measured 600ft/192.2m, with the most enchanting being that this was the distance the hero Hercules could run on a single breath.

As well as competition, training took place at Olympia. At first this happened outdoors but during the Hellenistic period (323BC-31BC) the palestra and the gymnasium were built. Home to practitioners of wrestling, boxing, pankration and the long jump, the palestra’s main feature was a large, square inner-courtyard. It was flanked by colonnades and had an extensive bathing system in the adjoining rooms. The gymnasium was an elongated rectangle with space for both the javelin and discus throwers to do their thing. Both buildings were centres of intellectual debate and learning, with philosophers and teachers taking advantage of the shade and abundance of young minds.

By the Roman period these training facilities, along with the rest of the site, had, quite apart from the religious aspect, become a year-round tourist attraction.

“People put up big fancy artworks and dedications, so it became a famous site to go see Greek art,” Christesen said. “Certainly by the Roman period there were people making a living as guides to the site.”

And below is an exert from the following link-

Decline and Revival of the Olympic Tradition

After the Roman Empire conquered Greece in the mid-2nd century B.C., the Games continued, but their standards and quality declined. In one notorious example from A.D. 67, the decadent Emperor Nero entered an Olympic chariot race, only to disgrace himself by declaring himself the winner even after he fell off his chariot during the event. In A.D. 393, Emperor Theodosius I, a Christian, called for a ban on all “pagan” festivals, ending the ancient Olympic tradition after nearly 12 centuries.

It would be another 1,500 years before the Games would rise again, largely thanks to the efforts of Baron Pierre de Coubertin (1863-1937) of France. Dedicated to the promotion of physical education, the young baron became inspired by the idea of creating a modern Olympic Games after visiting the ancient Olympic site. In November 1892, at a meeting of the Union des Sports Athlétiques in Paris, Coubertin proposed the idea of reviving the Olympics as an international athletic competition held every four years. Two years later, he got the approval he needed to found the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which would become the governing body of the modern Olympic Games.

The Olympics Through the Years

The first modern Olympics were held in Athens, Greece, in 1896. In the opening ceremony, King Georgios I and a crowd of 60,000 spectators welcomed 280 participants from 13 nations (all male), who would compete in 43 events, including track and field, gymnastics, swimming, wrestling, cycling, tennis, weightlifting, shooting and fencing. All subsequent Olympiads have been numbered even when no Games take place (as in 1916, during World War I, and in 1940 and 1944, during World War II). The official symbol of the modern Games is five interlocking colored rings, representing the continents of North and South America, Asia, Africa, Europe and Australia. The Olympic flag, featuring this symbol on a white background, flew for the first time at the Antwerp Games in 1920.

The Olympics truly took off as an international sporting event after 1924, when the VIII Games were held in Paris. Some 3,000 athletes (with more than 100 women among them) from 44 nations competed that year, and for the first time the Games featured a closing ceremony. The Winter Olympics debuted that year, including such events as figure skating, ice hockey, bobsledding and the biathlon. Eighty years later, when the 2004 Summer Olympics returned to Athens for the first time in more than a century, nearly 11,000 athletes from a record 201 countries competed. In a gesture that joined both ancient and modern Olympic traditions, the shotput competition that year was held at the site of the classical Games in Olympia.

And if you need to reflect on some of the brightest moments in Olympic History, try the following from the following site-

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/1183244-the-15-greatest-record-breaking-performances-in-summer-olympic-history#slide0

 

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